Last edited by Voodoom
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

4 edition of The man who found Nineveh found in the catalog.

The man who found Nineveh

the story of Austen Henry Layard

by Robert Silverberg

  • 133 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Holt, Rinehart and Winston in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Juvenile literature

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDS70.88.L3 S5
    The Physical Object
    Pagination207 p.
    Number of Pages207
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24748066M
    LC Control Number64018257
    OCLC/WorldCa1360596

    The man Jonah was the main character of the book, he was the son of Amittai (Jonah ), and a native of Gathhepher, which was a city of the tribe of Zebulun in the northern Galilee region. Jonah was a prophet of the Lord and he was called to deliver a message of repentance to the city of Nineveh which was the capital of the Assyrian Empire.   As the book turns to the battle for Nineveh, the text announces God’s principle weapon. The prophet envisioned one man coming against the Assyrian juggernaut and its fortified capital. Nahum called him מֵפִיץ. Throughout the centuries, translators have struggled to identify this : Gregory D. Cook.

    Jonah Flees from the LORD (Nahum )1 Now the word of the LORD came to Jonah son of Amittai, saying, 2 “Arise! Go to the great city of Nineveh and preach against it, because its wickedness has come up before Me.” 3 Jonah, however, got up and fled to Tarshish, away from the presence of the LORD. He went down to Joppa and found a ship bound for Tarshish. By April, 28 chambers had been discovered. Ivory ornaments and tablets found. Copper vessels found, but unable to be preserved. Pavement slabs with new names of Assyrian kings. Several tombs found, walled with brick; artifacts described. Ruins of a building found under the tombs. About wall panel slabs found stacked up instead of on the walls.

    Nineveh. First mentioned in Genesis , which is rendered in the Revised Version, "He [i.e., Nimrod] went forth into Assyria and builded Nineveh."It is not again noticed till the days of Jonah, when it is described (Jonah ; ) as a great and populous city, the flourishing capital of the Assyrian empire (2 Kings ; Isaiah ).The book of the prophet Nahum is almost exclusively.   Another reason for God’s anger against Nineveh was its extreme pride, implied in Nahum The pride of Nineveh may have been due in part to its wealth and power. One account reveals, “In Sennacherib’s day the wall around Nineveh was 40 to 50 feet high. It extended for 4 kilometers along the Tigris River and for 13 kilometers around the.


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The man who found Nineveh by Robert Silverberg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy a cheap copy of The man who found Nineveh;: The story of book. Free shipping over $ The Man Who Found Nineveh [Robert Silverberg] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.5/5(1).

The Man Who Found Nineveh: The Story of Austen Henry Layard [Robert Silverberg] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Man Who Found Nineveh: The Story of Austen Henry Layard5/5(1). Get this from a library. The man who found Nineveh; the story of Austen Henry Layard.

[Robert Silverberg] -- Biography of Austen Henry Layard, the archaeologist who excavated the ancient Assyrian city of Nineveh in the 19th century. Grades COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Nineveh was one of the greatest cities of its time and was an important religious center around BC. However, the city was sacked in BC, and its citizens were either deported or murdered.

From that time forward, the city remained unoccupied, until Layard’s excavation in the mids brought its treasures back into the : Skyhorse Publishing. The Man Who Found Nineveh: The Story of Austen Henry Layard, Holt Rinehart Winston Hard cover book, pp.

The Man Who Found Nineveh: The Story of Austen Henry Layard, World's Work Hard cover book, pp. Access-restricted-item true Addeddate Boxid IA Camera Canon EOS 5D Mark II Curatenote shipped Donor bostonpubliclibrary External-identifierPages: Nineveh is very much a character-driven book, there is a plot but the focus is mainly on Katya and the deserted estate Nineveh which is very much a character in itself.

It is, in my opinion, a story about nature, not the phenomena of the physical world but traits and qualities/5. The man who found Nineveh;: The story of Austen Henry Layard by Silverberg, Robert and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The Book of Nahum consists of two parts: Chapter one shows the majesty and might of God the LORD in goodness and severity.

Chapters two and three describe the fall of Nineveh, which later took place in BC. Nineveh is compared to Thebes, the Egyptian city that Assyria itself had destroyed in BC. First mentioned in Genesiswhich is rendered in the Revised Version, "He [i.e., Nimrod] went forth into Assyria and builded Nineveh."It is not again noticed till the days of Jonah, when it is described (Jonah ; ) as a great and populous city, the flourishing capital of the Assyrian empire (2 Kings ; Isaiah ).The book of the prophet Nahum is almost exclusively taken up.

Nineveh and the Archaeological Evidence when Layard produced his first book “Nineveh and its Remains” it became a bestseller and rejuvenated a dying faith in the public consciousness. The man who found Nineveh: the story of Austen Henry Layard.

Tadworth: World's Work. MLA Citation. Silverberg, Robert. The man who found Nineveh: the story of Austen Henry Layard World's Work Tadworth Australian/Harvard Citation.

Silverberg, Robert. The man who found Nineveh: the story of Austen Henry Layard World's Work Tadworth. Jonah - Arise, go unto Nineveh, that great city, and preach unto it the preaching that I bid thee.

Jonah - So the people of Nineveh believed God, and proclaimed a fast, and put on sackcloth, from the greatest of them even to the least of them. Nahum - The burden of Nineveh. The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite. Sir Austen Henry Layard, (born March 5,Paris—died July 5,London), English archaeologist whose excavations greatly increased knowledge of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia.

In he left his position in a London law office and began an adventuresome journey on horseback through Anatolia and Syria. In the British ambassador at Istanbul, Sir Stratford Canning.

The Book of Jonah is a book of the Nevi'im ("Prophets") in the Hebrew tells of a Hebrew prophet named Jonah son of Amittai who is sent by God to prophesy the destruction of Nineveh but tries to escape the divine mission.

Set in the reign of Jeroboam II (– BC), it was probably written in the post-exilic period, some time between the late 5th to early 4th century BC. In the New Testament, the phrase is found over 80 times. Here is just a sampling of those verses, usually when Jesus is referring to himself.

Matthew Jesus replied, “Foxes have dens and birds have nests, but the Son of Man has no place to lay his head.”. Matthew But I want you to know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins.”Author: Kyle Blevins. Nineveh: Nergal Gate The partially reconstructed Nergal Gate in Nineveh, Iraq.

Staff Sgt. JoAnn S. Makinano/U.S. Air Force; The first person to survey and map Nineveh was the archaeologist Claudius J.

Rich ina work later completed by Felix Jones and published by him in Excavations have been undertaken intermittently since that period by many persons. God’s final question is, “Jonah, should I not have compassion on Nineveh?” The implicit question behind it is, “Should you, too, not have My compassion for Nineveh?” The book ends with this unanswered question.

Did Jonah get the point and repent. I think that the existence of the book shows that he did. 1. It is a true story. Contrary to the critics and skeptics, I believe this story is recorded as sober, historical truth. That is, there really was a man named Jonah, who really did flee to Tarshish, who really was swallowed whole by a great fish, who really did survive for three days in the fish’s belly, and who actually was vomited up on dry ground.This familiar expression is found in many books of the Bible, occurring 92x (e.g., Genesis ; 2 Samuel ; 1 Kings, etc.) but Jonah is the only book of the Bible that begins with it.

The book is divided into two sections: chapters 1 and 3 comprise one section and chapters 2 and 4 the other.2 PART 1 Passage to Tarshish Now the word of the LORD came to Jonah the son of Amittai, saying, “Arise, go to Nineveh, that great city, and cry out against it; for their wickedness has come up before Me.” But Jonah arose to flee to Tarshish from the presence of the LORD.

He went down to Joppa, and found a ship going to Tarshish; so he paid the fare.